Replacing the Front Door

The front door we inherited was scruffy, ugly and no longer fit for purpose. It was definitely time to shake things up a bit.

The Old Front Door

Welcome to our (old) front door – it was a nasty dirty cream colour, as you can see below.

Inside was just as bad. Our hallway is small compact and having the fan light as the only source of natural light meant that it felt quite claustrophobic.

In the top left of the picture below you can see that the space which the door opened into was very congested. That mess of wires you can see there is the electric meter, consumer unit and door bell. The front door used to hit these hanging cables and therefore we couldn’t open it fully and it would bounce back when you were trying to get through with heavy shopping etc.

The door had been badly fitted, leaving us with a very high threshold – a 10.5 inch step up from outside in fact. It was even worse when leaving and some of our more, ahem, “mature” guests often caught their feet on it as they attempted to conquer the awkwardly large step down through a narrow doorway.


To add insult to injury the fixtures and fittings were tarnished, wobbly and tired – ew!

Love Your Door/Truedor

We ordered a door from Truedor through a local independent company called Love Your Door. We cannot speak highly enough of both of these companies! Love Your Door were especially helpful. Paul had loads of suggestions about how we could achieve exactly what we wanted from our new door, was clear about the costs and gave a really reasonable quote.

We also got a quote from Everest to compare against – big mistake! They quoted us upwards of £5000 for a door that wasn’t anything like what we wanted. Their representative was desperate to sell us a uPVC door, even though we were really clear from the outset that we did not want one. I was then called repeatedly for weeks afterwards offering me discounts on the quoted price (even though we were told in the appointment that he’d already discounted it as much as possible to get to the £5000 sum). Never again!

The New Front Door

Onto the door itself. We went for Truedor’s Monet TR1F composite door in Anthracite Grey with brushed steel furniture.  There were loads of options available so it was really easy to customise the door to be exactly how we wanted it.

Replacing the door also meant replacing the fan light and the glass in this and the door itself is all triple glazed so it should be nice and warm in the winter.

Here it is in all its glory…

It looks so much smarter – our poor, raggedy front garden is seriously letting us down now! Things were even more exciting on the inside…

We have so much more light in the hallway throughout the whole day! It has brightened everything up considerably.

We also managed to lower the door by putting a level threshold in and our electrician shortened some of those pesky cables. This means we can box all of this in now (whilst still being able to fully open the door) and neaten the whole thing up! Lowering the door also means the door is safer and we have a slightly bigger fan light which went even further to improving the light levels!

Before: Light levels inside
After: Much better!

We love our new Truedor – it is excellent quality, feels really safe and looks lovely inside and out. Now we just need to get the rest of the front and the hallway up to the same standard!

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4 thoughts on “Replacing the Front Door”

  1. The outside of your house looks almost exactly like mine. I got it all renovated by http://thehomeexpert.uk/ and I couldn’t be happier. They repainted it perfectly and exchanged the hideous front door just like you did, the result is stunning.

  2. Love that front door! We’ve had to keep ours…it’s not too horrendous, so I can live with it. I look forward to new posts to see how the house is continuing!
    https:www.dreamofhome.co.uk

  3. we did this I hated my old front door (modern colonial style) and we swapped it for a salvaged Victorian one. We removed two panels from it and put security clear glass in, to let light flood into the hall. The total cost including door glass and labour (for putting the door in and making it good) was £450. What kind of door are you going for?

    1. We went for a composite door – we did lots of research and decided it was best for us/the Raggedy House as they’re safe, warm and easily maintainable. I love wooden doors though – Mike’s parents have a really lovely one on their Victorian property!

      I’ve just found your posts on doors so I will be checking them out!! Thanks for stopping by 🙂

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